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Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2019 was released on June 6th 2019. Its digital version will be available on June 24th 2019.

Topic: Rotating electrical machines, drives and power electronics; Electromobility

Main Article
Hybrid drive of shunting locomotive

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2019 was released on June 11th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 17th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Euroluce 2019 by designers eyes
Exhibition Light in architecture 2019
Amper 2019 in capture of sophisticated technologies

Refreshing our memory
Lighting glass from Kamenný pahorek

Stanford researchers’ artificial synapse is fast, efficient and durable

29.04.2019 | Stanford University | www.stanford.edu

The brain’s capacity for simultaneously learning and memorizing large amounts of information while requiring little energy has inspired an entire field to pursue brain-like – or neuromorphic – computers. Researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories previously developed one portion of such a computer: a device that acts as an artificial synapse, mimicking the way neurons communicate in the brain.

In a paper published online by the journal Science, the team reports that a prototype array of nine of these devices performed even better than expected in processing speed, energy efficiency, reproducibility and durability. Looking forward, the team members want to combine their artificial synapse with traditional electronics, which they hope could be a step toward supporting artificially intelligent learning on small devices.

Artificial synapse

The team’s artificial synapse is similar to a battery, modified so that the researchers can dial up or down the flow of electricity between the two terminals. That flow of electricity emulates how learning is wired in the brain. This is an especially efficient design because data processing and memory storage happen in one action, rather than a more traditional computer system where the data is processed first and then later moved to storage.

Read more at Stanford University

Image Credit: Armantas Melianas a Scott Keene

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