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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2020 was released on June 24th 2020. Its digital version will be available on July 24th 2020.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering

Main Article
New traction power supply technology 25 kV/50 Hz (part 2)

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2020 was released on June 8th 2020. Its digital version will be available on July 8th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Announcement: LUMEN V4 2020 is cancelled
What is new in CIE, April 2020

Accessories of lighting installations
Foxtrot as a “Master Control” in Hotel Breukelen
Lighting regulators – control of lighting on the constant level

You Can Hail a Self-Driving Uber in San Francisco

23. 12. 2016 | The Verge | www.theverge.com

For the last few months, Uber’s self-driving cars have been prowling the streets of San Francisco, forecasting the inevitable moment when the ride-hailing giant starts inviting passengers to take autonomous trips in the city where it first launched over seven years ago. That moment has finally arrived.

Starting on December, anyone in San Francisco who hails an UberX could find themselves in the backseat of a luxury, self-driving Volvo XC90, complete with leather interior, spinning LIDAR sensor, and a trunk full of computing power.

Self-Driving Car from Uber

While riding in the car is an uneventful experience, keeping pace with Uber's brazen moves to push autonomy onto the public street is not boring. California has some of the strictest autonomous driving rules in the country, and the state’s DMV does not have Uber listed among the companies that have obtained permits to test their vehicles on public roads.

Compared to the Ford Fusions Uber is using in Pittsburgh, the XC90’s self-driving technology is more streamlined and integrated into the vehicle. There were only seven cameras, down from 22 on the Fusions. Radar sensors are installed behind the front bumper, rather than protruding off the side of the vehicle like an unsightly boil. But the tech isn’t totally unobtrusive: the car still had the spinning LIDAR sensor perched on top to provide a 360-degree laser scan of the environment.

Read more at The Verge

Image Credit: The Verge

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