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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2018 was released on February 14th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2018.

Topic: Electrical devices; Devices for smart grids; Internet of Things

Main Article
Power flow control in grid using power converters

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2018 was released on February 5th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2018.

Architectural and scenic lighting
Mexican light
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 34
Lighting technology documentation – part 2 Schemes for scenic lighting

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
NITECO LED luminaires – guarantied lifespan and warm white light not only for public lighting

World’s Smallest Tape Recorder Is Built From Microbes

24.11.2017 | Columbia University Medical Center | newsroom.cumc.columbia.edu

Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork for a new class of technologies that use bacterial cells for everything from disease diagnosis to environmental monitoring.

The researchers modified an ordinary laboratory strain of the ubiquitous human gut microbe Escherichia coli, enabling the bacteria to not only record their interactions with the environment but also time-stamp the events.

Recorder made from bacteria

Such bacteria, swallowed by a patient, might be able to record the changes they experience through the whole digestive tract, yielding an unprecedented view of previously inaccessible phenomena,” says Harris Wang, assistant professor in the Departments of Pathology & Cell Biology and Systems Biology at CUMC and senior author on the new work, described in today’s issue of Science. Other applications could include environmental sensing and basic studies in ecology and microbiology, where bacteria could monitor otherwise invisible changes without disrupting their surroundings.

Read more at Columbia University Medical Center

Image Credit: Wang Lab/Columbia University Medical Center

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