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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2019 was released on January 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2019.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring material

Main Article
Electrically conductive adhesives for electrical engineering
Smart Cities (part 6)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2018 was released on December 3rd 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2019.

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modular floodlights Siteco
Decorative luminaire PRESBETON H-E-X from the integral series town equipment
LED luminaires ESALITE – revolution in sphere of industrial lighting

Daylight
About median illumination by daylight
Professional colloquium Daylight in practice

World’s First 1,000-Processor Chip

20.06.2016 | University of California, Davis | www.ucdavis.edu

Amicrochip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The energy-efficient KiloCore chip has a maximum computation rate of 1.78 trillion instructions per second and contains 621 million transistors.

The KiloCore chip was fabricated by IBM using their 32 nm CMOS technology. Each processor core can run its own small program independently of the others, which is a fundamentally more flexible approach than so-called Single-Instruction-Multiple-Data approaches utilized by processors such as GPUs; the idea is to break an application up into many small pieces, each of which can run in parallel on different processors, enabling high throughput with lower energy use.

First microchip with 1000 processors

Because each processor is independently clocked, it can shut itself down to further save energy when not needed. Cores operate at an average maximum clock frequency of 1.78 GHz, and they transfer data directly to each other rather than using a pooled memory area that can become a bottleneck for data.

The 1,000 processors can execute 115 billion instructions per second while dissipating only 0.7 Watts, low enough to be powered by a single AA battery. The KiloCore chip executes instructions more than 100 times more efficiently than a modern laptop processor.

Read more at University of California, Davis

Image Credit: University of California, Davis

-jk-