We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

We’re closer to a future where we can 3D print anything

06.04.2016 | Quartz | www.qz.com

3D printing has not yet lived up to the hype heaped upon it, which we can mostly chalk up to the technical challenge of consistently printing multiple materials, and in multiple colors at once. But Stratasys, the largest 3D-printing company in the world, says its newest industrial printer does both, marking what it says is an “industry breakthrough.”

The J750 can print different materials in up to 360,000 different color shades, all in one print job. If the user is a footwear company that wants to print a prototype of a new shoe, the printer can run off the entire thing, from rubber sole to plastic eyelets, in one go. Without that ability, designers and engineers would need to continually reset their machines to print out different components, and then assemble them to get a finished product.

New inovative 3D printing

In the short term, being able to print out a prototype in one go means that companies may be able to bring products to market quicker than in the past. In the long term, Stratasys’ new machine hints at a future where final products—not just prototypes—can be produced straight from the printer. 3D printing is starting to prove that it could be more than a fad, and actually affect manufacturing, healthcare, and even the supper table.

Read more at Quartz

Image Credit: Stratasys

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