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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2019 was released on May 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available imediately.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; Fire and safety technologies

Main Article
Verification of material coefficient defined in the standard STN EN 62305-3
Smart Cities (final part 10)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2019 was released on March 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Architectural and scenic lighting
The architectural lighting of Bečov nad Teplou castle
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 41
The analyse of light picture a little more theoretic

Day light
Biggest mistakes in day lighting design of buildings

UO team makes artificial atoms that work at room temp

12.04.2019 | University of Oregon | www.uoregon.edu

Ultra-secure online communications, completely indecipherable if intercepted, are a step closer with the help of a recently published discovery by University of Oregon physicist Ben Alemán.

Alemán, a member of the UO’s Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science, has made artificial atoms that work in ambient conditions. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, could be a big step in efforts to develop secure quantum communication networks and all-optical quantum computing.

Artificial atoms

The big breakthrough is that we’ve discovered a simple, scalable way to nanofabricate artificial atoms onto a microchip, and that the artificial atoms work in air and at room temperature.” “Our artificial atoms will enable lots of new and powerful technologies,” he said. “In the future, they could be used for safer, more secure, totally private communications, and much more powerful computers that could design life-saving drugs and help scientists gain a deeper understanding of the universe through quantum computation,” said Ulemán.

Read more at University of Oregon

Image Credit: University of Oregon

-jk-