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ELEKTRO 12/2017 was released on December 6th 2017. Its digital version will be available on January 5th 2018.

Topic: Measurement, measuring devices and engineering; Testing and diagnostics

Main Article
Measurements on rotating machines using SFRA method
Application possibilities of ultra-capacitors or LiFePO4 batteries in trolley network of the Brno Public Transit Company

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2017 was released on December 11th 2017. Its digital version will be available on january 11th 2018.

Lighting installations
The lighting of university building Centrale Supélec in Saclay in France
The light for our future

Daylight
Application and judgment light guides Solatube®

UK approves world's biggest offshore wind farm project

17.08.2016 | Phys.org | phys.org

The British government gave the green light for what it called the world's biggest offshore wind farm to be built off the English coast.

The Hornsea Project Two farm should have up to 300 turbines and a capacity of up to 1.8 gigawatts. It could produce enough energy to power 1.6 million homes. It is an extension of the 1.2GW Hornsea Project One which was in itself being trumpeted as the world's biggest offshore wind farm.

The biggest offshore wind farm

Both projects are being developed by Danish group DONG Energy, the world's largest operator of offshore wind farms. London decided to grant development consent for Hornsea Project Two, located around 55 miles (90 kilometres) east of the English coast.

If built to full capacity, the Hornsea Project Two investment would total around £6 billion ($7.8 billion, 6.9 billion euros). The farm would create up to 1,960 construction jobs and 580 operational and maintenance jobs, the government said. The government said it expected 10GW of offshore wind to be installed by the end of the decade and a further 10GW of offshore wind capacity could be built in the 2020s.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Wikipedia

-jk-