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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2017 was released on October 10th 2017. Its digital version will be available on October 10th 2017.

Topic: Electrical power engineering; RES; Fuel cells; Batteries and accumulators

Main Article
Electricity storage
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of batteries

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

UCLA researchers turn carbon dioxide into sustainable concrete

16.03.2016 | UCLA | newsroom.ucla.edu

Imagine a world with little or no concrete. Would that even be possible? After all, concrete is everywhere — on our roads, our driveways, in our homes, bridges and buildings. For the past 200 years, it’s been the very foundation of much of our planet.

But the production of cement, which when mixed with water forms the binding agent in concrete, is also one of the biggest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, about 5 percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions comes from concrete. An even larger source of carbon dioxide emissions is flue gas emitted from smokestacks at power plants around the world. Carbon emissions from those plants are the largest source of harmful global greenhouse gas in the world.

Making concrete out of carbon dioxide

A team of interdisciplinary researchers at UCLA has been working on a unique solution that may help eliminate these sources of greenhouse gases. Their plan would be to create a closed-loop process: capturing carbon from power plant smokestacks and using it to create a new building material — CO2NCRETE — that would be fabricated using 3D printers. That’s “upcycling.” Thus far, the new construction material has been produced only at a lab scale, using 3-D printers to shape it into tiny cones.

Read more at UCLA

Image Credit: UCLA

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