We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

Two-dimensional polymer that could revolutionise energy storage

15.03.2017 | Science Daily | www.sciencedaily.com

Polymers, such as plastic and synthetic textiles, are very useful technological commodities that have revolutionised daily life and industries. A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully pushed the frontier of polymer technology further by creating novel two-dimensional (2D) graphene-like polymer sheets.

The novel polymer sheets synthesised by the NUS team are unique because of their good electrical conductivities and highly regular, sub-nanometer sized pores, which can be used to store sodium ions efficiently and safely in sodium ion batteries. Sodium ion batteries are a type of rechargeable metal-ion battery that uses sodium ions as charge carriers.

New 2D polymer

As there is an abundance of sodium, sodium ion batteries are cheaper to produce than lithium ion batteries. However, the disadvantage is that they do not last long. The 2D polymer developed by researchers can be mass produced at low cost for use as the electrode for sodium ion batteries, enabling such batteries to perform at high capacity for thousands of charge cycles.

Read more at Science Daily

Image Credit: National University of Singapore

-jk-