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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2018 was released on February 14th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2018.

Topic: Electrical devices; Devices for smart grids; Internet of Things

Main Article
Power flow control in grid using power converters

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2018 was released on February 5th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2018.

Architectural and scenic lighting
Mexican light
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 34
Lighting technology documentation – part 2 Schemes for scenic lighting

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
NITECO LED luminaires – guarantied lifespan and warm white light not only for public lighting

Tiny high-performance solar cells turn power generation sideways

05.08.2016 | University of Wisconsin—Madison | news.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin—Madison engineers have created high-performance, micro-scale solar cells that outshine comparable devices in key performance measures. The miniature solar panels could power myriad personal devices — wearable medical sensors, smartwatches, even autofocusing contact lenses.

Large, rooftop photovoltaic arrays generate electricity from charges moving vertically. The new, small cells, capture current from charges moving side-to-side, or laterally. And they generate significantly more energy than other sideways solar systems. New-generation lateral solar cells promise to be the next big thing for compact devices because arranging electrodes horizontally allows engineers to sidestep a traditional solar cell fabrication process: the arduous task of perfectly aligning multiple layers of the cell’s material atop one another.

Micro photovoltaic cells

Top-down photovoltaic cells are made up of two electrodes surrounding a semiconducting material like slices of bread around the meat in a sandwich. When light hits the top slice, charge travels through the filling to the bottom layer and creates electric current. In the top-down arrangement, one layer needs to do two jobs: It must let in light and transmit charge. Therefore, the material for one electrode in a typical solar cell must be not only highly transparent, but also electrically conductive. And very few substances perform both tasks well.

Read more at University of Wisconsin—Madison

Image Credit: University of Wisconsin—Madison

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