We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2018 was released on June 6th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 26th 2018.

Topic: Rotating electrical machines, drives and power electronics; Electromobility

Main Article
Energy platform for vehicle-to-grid/home system
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 2)

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2018 was released on June 15th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 17th 2018.

Accessories of lighting installations
Evening with Foxtrot on the Czech heaven

Public lighting
Timeless luminaire for public lighting – Streetlight 11
Control of public lighting

Tiny high-performance solar cells turn power generation sideways

05.08.2016 | University of Wisconsin—Madison | news.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin—Madison engineers have created high-performance, micro-scale solar cells that outshine comparable devices in key performance measures. The miniature solar panels could power myriad personal devices — wearable medical sensors, smartwatches, even autofocusing contact lenses.

Large, rooftop photovoltaic arrays generate electricity from charges moving vertically. The new, small cells, capture current from charges moving side-to-side, or laterally. And they generate significantly more energy than other sideways solar systems. New-generation lateral solar cells promise to be the next big thing for compact devices because arranging electrodes horizontally allows engineers to sidestep a traditional solar cell fabrication process: the arduous task of perfectly aligning multiple layers of the cell’s material atop one another.

Micro photovoltaic cells

Top-down photovoltaic cells are made up of two electrodes surrounding a semiconducting material like slices of bread around the meat in a sandwich. When light hits the top slice, charge travels through the filling to the bottom layer and creates electric current. In the top-down arrangement, one layer needs to do two jobs: It must let in light and transmit charge. Therefore, the material for one electrode in a typical solar cell must be not only highly transparent, but also electrically conductive. And very few substances perform both tasks well.

Read more at University of Wisconsin—Madison

Image Credit: University of Wisconsin—Madison

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