We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2017 was released on September 5th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 5th 2017.

Topic: 59th International engineering fair in Brno; Electrical engineering in industry

Main Article
Fuel cells
Renaissance of synchronous reluctance motors
Actuator design working with electromagnetic field

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

Thermoelectric silicon material reaches record-low thermal conductivity

05.10.2016 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Researchers have theoretically demonstrated the lowest rate of heat transfer, or thermal conductivity, in any silicon-based material developed so far.

The new material, which is a polycrystalline silicon nanowire, breaks two limits: the Casimir limit and the amorphous limit. The Casimir limit is a theory that describes the thermal conductivity of nanostructures, and breaking it means that the thermal conductivity of the new material is lower than the value predicted by Casimir limit theory.

New thermoelectric material

The amorphous limit is regarded as the lowest thermal conductivity of a material, since amorphous structures strongly scatter heat carriers. However, due to its unique nanoscale design, the polycrystalline silicon nanowire has a thermal conductivity that is three times lower than that of amorphous silicon materials.

The researchers expect that the new material could be especially useful for thermoelectric applications. By converting heat energy into electricity, thermoelectric materials provide a way to capture some of the waste heat emitted by vehicle tailpipes, power plants, and manufacturing facilities, and then convert the heat into useful energy.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Adobe Stock

-jk-