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ELEKTRO 11/2018 was released on October 31th 2018. Its digital version will be available on November 30st 2018.

Topic: Switchboards and substations; Maintenance of electrical equipment; Rotating electrical machines and drives

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Smart Cities (part 4 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2018 was released on September 17th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Interiors lighting
Luminaire selection by the concept of interior
The unique book about interiors nowadays on market
Invitation on colloquium Interiéry 2018 – exceptional action for the seventh time

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Profesor Jiří Habel passed away – memories remain

Ten years after their debut, autonomous trucks are finally hitting the roads

07.10.2015 | ExtremeTech | www.extremetech.com

It was ten years ago this month that Terramax, the world’s first fully-autonomous truck, competed in the DARPA autonomous vehicle Grand Challenge.

At 32,000 pounds, with self-inflating tires, it was a prototype for what the US military hoped could be a safer way to transport supplies in war zones. This week Mercedes-Benz’s Daimler Truck unit ran the first test of a production model truck with an autonomous driving system on a public road. A modified Actros semi was driven on the Autobahn - with the truck’s radar-assisted Highway Pilot system taking control during the open road stretch of the trip. This isn’t the first open-road test of an autonomous truck - Mercedes’ division Freightliner tested a concept version in Nevada earlier, but it is the first test based on a production model.

Autonomous truck hits the road

The system employed by Mercedes uses both a short-range radar (up to about 230 feet) in a forward-facing arc, and a longer-range unit that scans to 820 feet in a much smaller arc. There is also a stereo camera for detecting signs and lane markings. Because the system is only designed to operate the truck while moving forward on a highway, it doesn’t need to have all the additional sensors that a fully autonomous vehicle like the Google self-driving car would.

When available, the Highway Pilot is activated simply by pressing a blue button. At any time when the system detects a driving condition it can’t handle (like a traffic jam or job site), it alerts the driver and will stop the truck if needed.

Read more at ExtremeTech

Image Credit: Mercedes-Benz

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