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Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2020 was released on June 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available on June 24th 2020.

Topic: Electrical machines, drives and power electronics, electromobility

Main Article
New traction power supply technology 25 kV/50 Hz (part 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Stanford engineers develop a plastic clothing material that cools the skin

2. 9. 2016 | Stanford University | news.stanford.edu

Stanford engineers have developed a low-cost, plastic-based textile that, if woven into clothing, could cool your body far more efficiently than is possible with the natural or synthetic fabrics in clothes we wear today.

This new material works by allowing the body to discharge heat in two ways that would make the wearer feel nearly 4 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than if they wore cotton clothing. The material cools by letting perspiration evaporate through the material, something ordinary fabrics already do. But the Stanford material provides a second, revolutionary cooling mechanism: allowing heat that the body emits as infrared radiation to pass through the plastic textile.

New material with cooling ability

To develop their cooling textile, the Stanford researchers blended nanotechnology, photonics and chemistry to give polyethylene – the clear, clingy plastic we use as kitchen wrap – a number of characteristics desirable in clothing material: It allows thermal radiation, air and water vapor to pass right through, and it is opaque to visible light.

Read more at Stanford University

Image Credit: L.A. Cicero

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