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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2020 was released on November 11th 2020. Its digital version will be available on December 2nd 2020.

Topic: Electrical switchboards and switchboard technology

Innovation, Technology, Projects
New energy law: an opportunity for energetics community
Data centres – third session
Starting October, REMA raises financial subsidy for recycling electrical devices

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism

13. 10. 2020 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Since the discovery of graphene more than 15 years ago, researchers have been in a global race to unlock its unique properties. Not only is graphene—a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice—the strongest, thinnest material known to man, it is also an excellent conductor of heat and electricity.

Now, a team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure. The findings appear in an article published in Nature Physics.

Twisting graphene

The work was inspired by recent studies of twisted monolayers or twisted bilayers of graphene, comprising either two or four total sheets. These materials were found to host an array of unusual electronic states driven by strong interactions between electrons. "We wondered what would happen if we combined graphene monolayers and bilayers into a twisted three-layer system," said Cory Dean, a professor of physics at Columbia University and one of the paper's senior authors. "We found that varying the number of graphene layers endows these composite materials with some exciting new properties that had not been seen before."

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Columbia University

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