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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2016 was released on November 7th 2016. Its digital version will be available on December 1st 2016.

 

Topic: Switchboards and switchboard engineering; Rotating electrical machines and power electronics; Maintenance of EE

 

Main Article

Lithium traction batteries for electric mobility (part 1)

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.

 

Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology

 

Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

Solar panels study reveals impact on the earth

13.07.2016 | Lancaster University | www.lancaster.ac.uk

Researchers have produced the first detailed study of the impact of solar parks on the environment, opening the door to smarter forms of farming and better land management.

Environmental Scientists at Lancaster University and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology monitored a large solar park, near Swindon, for a year. They found that solar parks altered the local climate, measuring cooling of as much as 5 degrees Centigrade under the panels during the summer but the effects varied depending on the time of year and the time of day.

Impact of solar panels on the land

Increasing energy demands and the drive towards low carbon energy sources have prompted a rapid increase in ground-mounted solar parks across the world. This means a significant land use change on a global scale and has prompted urgent calls for a detailed understanding of the impacts of solar parks on the fields beneath them.

The authors of the study say understanding the climate effects of solar parks will give farmers and land managers the knowledge they need to choose which crops to grow and how best to manage the land; there is potential to maximise biodiversity and improve yields.

Read more at Lancaster University

Image Credit: Lancaster University

-jk-