We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 3/2020 was released on March 13th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Trends in electrical engineering

Main Article
Use of frequency converter for experimentational device

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Solar array feeds railway route in the UK

26. 8. 2019 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

How well is the UK doing to seal a future of solar powered trains? Will connecting solar power directly to rail networks help meet a good enough share of electricity needs? Eyes are on a pilot scheme going on now and it is designed to plug into the track near Aldershot.

A solar farm set up to power a railway line directly is making news. It's a 30kW pilot scheme, said The Guardian, on Network Rail's Wessex route. As of Friday, about 100 solar panels at a trackside site were to supply electricity for signaling and lights on that route. This was a first in that it running trains on electricity generated specifically for the job, being solar energy, sourced from a trackside installation of panels—cutting out the electricity grid entirely.

Solar power for trains

Network Rail's resolve to adopt a greener railway is ambitious; plans are to involve spending "billions of pounds electrifying rail lines to avoid running trains on diesel," said Jillian Ambrose, The Guardian. Stuart Kistruck, a director for Network Rail's Wessex route, was quoted: "We have ambitions to roll this technology out further across the network should this demonstrator project prove successful." Riding Sunbeams estimates solar could power around 20 percent of the Merseyrail network in Liverpool and 15 percent of commuter routes in Kent, Sussex and Wessex.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Jose Gabriel Ortega Castro/Unsplash

-jk-