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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2016 was released on September 27th 2016. Its digital version will be available on October 27th 2016.


Topic: 22nd International trade fair ELO SYS 2016; Electrical Power Engineering; RES; Emergency Power Units


Main Article

Power system management under utilization of Smart Grid system

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.


Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology


Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

Soft robotic hand can pick up and identify a wide array of objects

02.10.2015 | CSAIL | www.csail.mit.edu

Robots have many strong suits, but delicacy traditionally hasn’t been one of them. Rigid limbs and digits make it difficult for them to grasp, hold, and manipulate a range of everyday objects without dropping or crushing them.

Recently, CSAIL researchers have discovered that the solution may be to turn to a substance more commonly associated with new buildings and Silly Putty: silicone. At a conference this month, researchers from CSAIL Director Daniela Rus’ Distributed Robotics Lab demonstrated a 3-D-printed robotic hand made out of silicone rubber that can lift and handle objects as delicate as an egg and as thin as a compact disc.

Robotic hand can pick up different objects

Just as impressively, its three fingers have special sensors that can estimate the size and shape of an object accurately enough to identify it from a set of multiple items. The gripper, which can also pick up such items as a tennis ball, a Rubik's cube and a Beanie Baby, is part of a larger body of work out of Rus’ lab at CSAIL aimed at showing the value of so-called “soft robots” made of unconventional materials such as silicone, paper, and fiber.

Researchers say that soft robots have a number of advantages over “hard” robots, including the ability to handle irregularly-shaped objects, squeeze into tight spaces, and readily recover from collisions.

Read more at CSAIL

Image Credit: CSAIL