We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2019 was released on February 13th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective, signalling and special

Main Article
Advanced power converter topology
Smart Cities (part 7)

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2019 was released on February 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation at LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition
Prolight + Sound 2019: keep up with time
The light at For Arch 2018 fair

Public lighting
Lights of towns and communities 2018 – the meeting at the round table

Snow-melting solar roads are being tested publicly in the US

09.10.2016 | Business Insider | www.businessinsider.com

A public square in Sandpoint, Idaho now has what looks like a light-up dance floor — 30 hexagonal tiles with flashing LEDs. But each tile is actually a solar panel, and collectively, the tiles will soon power a nearby fountain and restroom.

The installation, which debuted October 3, is the first public test of solar roadway technology in the US.  Solar Roadways, the company that developed the technology being demonstrated in Idaho, was founded in 2006 by husband-wife team Scott and Julie Brusaw. The trial in Sandpoint is meant to test the company’s newest prototype, called SR3 since it’s the third iteration.

Tests of solar roadway in Idaho

Each SR3 tile contains a 44-watt solar panel. The tiles are designed to heat themselves so the hardware doesn’t freeze when temperatures drop, ensuring the panels can generate energy year round (and eliminating the need for a snow plow on roads that use the tiles).

The tempered glass that coats the panels is durable; it can withstand the weight of a semi truck. And the LED lights actually serve a purpose as well — they’re designed to replace painted lane markers, making it easier to change a road's design if it undergoes construction.

The company has received several grants from the US Department of Transportation, and raised an impressive $2.2 million in an Indiegogo campaign. In addition to helping end dependence on fossil fuels, Scott and Julie Brusaw also envision a future in which Solar Roadways tiles could be used in solar parking lots that charge electric cars.

Read more at Business Insider

Image Credit: Solar Roadways

-jk-