We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2020 was released on February 12th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrical apparatus, Internet of Things; Medical technologies

Main Article
Monitoring vacancy of an intelligent building

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2020 was released on February 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 3th 2020.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation for Light+Building 2020 – attendant programme
Prolicht+Sound fair celebrates the 25th birthday
FOR CITY 2020 introduces oneself in parallel to FOR ARCH fair

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modern trends in automobile headlamps

Simple, solar-powered water desalination

12.02.2020 | MIT | www.mit.edu

A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at MIT and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area. Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source.

The system uses multiple layers of flat solar evaporators and condensers, lined up in a vertical array and topped with transparent aerogel insulation. The key to the system’s efficiency lies in the way it uses each of the multiple stages to desalinate the water. At each stage, heat released by the previous stage is harnessed instead of wasted. In this way, the team’s demonstration device can achieve an overall efficiency of 385 percent in converting the energy of sunlight into the energy of water evaporation.

Making clear water from salt water

The device is essentially a multilayer solar still, with a set of evaporating and condensing components like those used to distill liquor. It uses flat panels to absorb heat and then transfer that heat to a layer of water so that it begins to evaporate. The vapor then condenses on the next panel. That water gets collected, while the heat from the vapor condensation gets passed to the next layer.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

-jk-