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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2020 was released on November 11th 2020. Its digital version will be available on December 2nd 2020.

Topic: Electrical switchboards and switchboard technology

Innovation, Technology, Projects
New energy law: an opportunity for energetics community
Data centres – third session
Starting October, REMA raises financial subsidy for recycling electrical devices

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Sheaths Become Mighty New Layer in Research Team’s Artificial Muscles

12. 7. 2019 | University of Texas in Dallas | www.utdallas.edu

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line.

In a new study published in the journal Science, the researchers describe their latest advance, called sheath-run artificial muscles, or SRAMs. The research group’s previous muscles were made by twisting CNT yarn, polymer fishing line or nylon sewing thread. By twisting these fibers to the point that they coil, the researchers produced muscles that dramatically contract, or actuate, along their length when heated and return to their initial length when cooled.

Artificial muscles

To form the new muscles, the research team applied a polymer coating to twisted CNT yarns, as well as to inexpensive nylon, silk and bamboo yarns, creating a sheath around the yarn core. When operated electrochemically, a muscle consisting of a CNT sheath and a nylon core generated an average contractile power that is 40 times that of human muscle and nine times that of the highest power alternative electrochemical muscle.

Read more at University of Texas in Dallas

Image Credit: University of Texas in Dallas

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