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Current issue

ELEKTRO 3/2021 was released on March 10th 2021. Its digital version will be available on March 26th 2021.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; Surge protection

Innovation, Technology, Projects
History of STEGO products
Industry 4.0 – past and present
Panasonic: Industrial automation products for your testing
ABB announced a significant increase in the number of charging stations in the Czech Republic

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2021 was released 2.12.2021. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Interiors lighting
Interior of the year 2020 – offices in time of home office
PROLICHT CZECH fulfils images of architect about illumination of Obecní dvůr residence at Prague Old Town

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Covid 19 – are there actually any news at lighting producer?
Lighting systems of STEINEL company

Self-folding metamaterial

26. 9. 2018 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

The more complex the object, the harder it is to fold up. Space satellites often need many small motors to fold up an instrument, and people have difficulty simply folding up a roadmap. Physicists from Leiden and Amsterdam have now designed a structure that folds itself up in several steps. The results from this research will be published in Nature.

The folding principle is simple but it involves several steps that need to be performed in the right order. And roadmaps are peanuts compared to the sunshields and instrument arms that satellites fold in and out. Each step requires a small motor that performs its task at the right moment.

Self-folding metamaterial

Physicists Martin van Hecke (Leiden University/AMOLF) and Corentin Coulais (University of Amsterdam), together with their students, have now designed a structure that folds itself up in several steps when slight pressure is exerted on the sides.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Leiden Institute of Physics

-jk-