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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2019 was released on February 13th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective, signalling and special

Main Article
Advanced power converter topology
Smart Cities (part 7)

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2019 was released on February 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation at LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition
Prolight + Sound 2019: keep up with time
The light at For Arch 2018 fair

Public lighting
Lights of towns and communities 2018 – the meeting at the round table

Self-assembling nanomaterial offers pathway to more efficient, affordable harnessing of solar power

25.01.2019 | Journal of Physical Chemistry | pubs.acs.org

Solar rays are a plentiful, clean source of energy that is becoming increasingly important as the world works to shift away from power sources that contribute to global warming. But current methods of harvesting solar charges are expensive and inefficient—with a theoretical efficiency limit of 33 percent.

New nanomaterials developed by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) could provide a pathway to more efficient and potentially affordable harvesting of solar energy.

Self-assembly nanomaterials

The materials, created by scientists with the ASRC's Nanoscience Initiative, use a process called singlet fission to produce and extend the life of harvestable light-generated electrons. The discovery is described in a newly published paper in the Journal of Physical Chemistry. Early research suggests these materials could create more usable charges and increase the theoretical efficiency of solar cells up to 44 percent.

Read more at Journal of Physical Chemistry

Image Credit: Andrew Levine

-jk-