We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2019 was released on June 6th 2019. Its digital version will be available on June 24th 2019.

Topic: Rotating electrical machines, drives and power electronics; Electromobility

Main Article
Hybrid drive of shunting locomotive

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2019 was released on June 11th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 17th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Euroluce 2019 by designers eyes
Exhibition Light in architecture 2019
Amper 2019 in capture of sophisticated technologies

Refreshing our memory
Lighting glass from Kamenný pahorek

Scientists develop safer, more durable lithium-ion battery that can operate under extreme conditions

13.11.2017 | Johns Hopkins University | hub.jhu.edu

Lithium-ion batteries have become the energy storage method of choice for consumer electronics and military and aerospace systems alike. But potential safety hazards associated with the organic electrolytes that are used in Li-ion battery cells remain an ongoing concern.

Team of scientists at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory has partnered with researchers from the University of Maryland and the Army Research Laboratory to develop a new type of flexible lithium-ion battery that is not hazardous and can operate under extreme conditions including cutting, submersion, and ballistic impact.

Durable li-ion battery

The team operated their flexible Li-ion battery in open air with minimal packaging, using only some electronically insulating, heat-resistant tape to keep it in place. In their demonstration, the battery powered a significant motor load without any safety concerns. To demonstrate the full safety potential, the team performed a series of tests while the battery was in operation, including cutting it, immersing it in sea water, and subjecting it to ballistic testing at an APL facility.

Read more at Johns Hopkins University

Image Credit: Johns Hopkins University

-jk-