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Current issue

ELEKTRO 4/2019 was released on April 17th 2019. Its digital version will be available on May 13th 2019.

Topic: Topic: Electroinstallation; Smart buildings; IoT; HVAC; Security technology

Main Article
Smart Cities (part 9)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2019 was released on March 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Architectural and scenic lighting
The architectural lighting of Bečov nad Teplou castle
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 41
The analyse of light picture a little more theoretic

Day light
Biggest mistakes in day lighting design of buildings

Scientists develop new materials that move in response to light

24.07.2018 | Tufts University | www.tufts.edu

Researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering have developed magnetic elastomeric composites that move in different ways when exposed to light, raising the possibility that these materials could enable a wide range of products that perform simple to complex movements, from tiny engines and valves to solar arrays that bend toward the sunlight.

The light actuated materials created in this study are based on the principle of the Curie temperature – the temperature above which certain materials will change their magnetic properties. By heating and cooling a magnetic material, one can turn its magnetism off and on. The basic movements of the material, shaped into films, sponges, and hydrogels, are induced by nearby permanent or electromagnets and can exhibit as bending, twisting, and expansion.

Material reacting to light source

Materials used to create the light actuated materials include polydimethylsoloxane (PDMS), which is a widely used transparent elastomer often shaped into flexible films, and silk fibroin, which is a versatile biocompatible material with excellent optical properties that can be shaped into a wide range of forms – from films to gels, threads, blocks and sponges.

Read more at Tufts University

Image Credit: Mike Silver

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