We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2020 was released on January 20th 2020. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring materia

Main Article
Using mHealth technolgy for automated data collection and transmission

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2019 was released on December 9th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 9th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Light technology konference of Visegrád countries LUMEN V4 2020 – 1st announcement
23rd International conference SVĚTLO – LIGHT 2019
56th Conference of Society for development public lighting in Plzeň
What is new in CIE

Interiors lighting
Halla illuminated new Booking.com offices in Prague centre

Scientists combine light and matter to make particles with new behaviors

05.07.2019 | University of Chicago | www.uchicago.edu

Every type of atom in the universe has a unique fingerprint: It only absorbs or emits light at the particular energies that match the allowed orbits of its electrons. That fingerprint enables scientists to identify an atom wherever it is found. A hydrogen atom in outer space absorbs light at the same energies as one on Earth.

While physicists have learned how electric and magnetic fields can manipulate this fingerprint, the number of features that make it up usually remains constant. In work published July 3 in the journal Nature, University of Chicago researchers challenged this paradigm by shaking electrons with lasers to create “doppelganger” features at new energies—a breakthrough that lets scientists create hybrid particles which are part-atom and part-light, with a wide variety of new behaviors.

Particles with new characteristics

The research is part of a greater effort in Assoc. Prof. Jonathan Simon’s lab to break down the walls between matter and light, in order to investigate their fundamental properties. In addition to learning about how materials behave at the quantum level, this work could one day help create more powerful computers or virtually “unhackable” quantum communications.

Read more at University of Chicago

Image Credit: Shutterstock

-jk-