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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

Researchers using 3D printed bacteria to make graphene-like material

27.03.2017 | 3ders | www.3ders.org

Researchers at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands are using 3D printed bacteria to create bespoke, graphene-like materials.

The secret to the new technique is bacteria—3D printed bacteria, to be precise. The researchers have discovered that bacteria can be deposited in precise lines using a 3D printer to turn graphene oxide—a compound of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen—into a material that closely resembles graphene.

3D printing with bacteria

The trick is getting these bacteria to „reduce” the graphene oxide, by pulling oxygen atoms off the material as they metabolize. This process of reduction can also be achieved with heat or chemicals, but the researchers say that bacteria is cheaper and more eco-friendly.

The researchers hacked an ordinary desktop 3D printer to make it print bacteria onto a surface in precise lines just 1 millimeter wide. Printing bacteria is no mean feat, of course, and the researchers had to make a special concoction of E. coli mixed with a gel made from algae. They 3D printed this cocktail onto a dish containing calcium ions, and these calcium ions make the gel solidify upon contact. This keeps the bacteria exactly where they need to be.

Read more at 3ders

Image Credit: Delft University of Technology

-jk-