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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2019 was released on May 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available imediately.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; Fire and safety technologies

Main Article
Verification of material coefficient defined in the standard STN EN 62305-3
Smart Cities (final part 10)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2019 was released on March 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Architectural and scenic lighting
The architectural lighting of Bečov nad Teplou castle
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 41
The analyse of light picture a little more theoretic

Day light
Biggest mistakes in day lighting design of buildings

Researchers just identified a new 2D insulators with ferromagnetic properties

13.05.2019 | Ames Laboratory | www.ameslab.gov

Collaborating scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Princeton University have discovered a new layered ferromagnetic semiconductor, a rare type of material that holds great promise for next-generation electronic technologies.

As the name implies, semiconductors are the Goldilocks of electrically conductive materials-- not a metal, and not an insulator, but a “just-right” in-between whose conducting properties can be altered and customized in ways that create the basis for the world’s modern electronic capabilities. Especially rare are the ones closer to an insulator than to a metal.

2D insulator

Being able to exfoliate these materials down into 2D layers gives us new opportunities to find unusual properties that are potentially useful to electronic technology advances.” “It’s sort of like getting a new shape of Lego bricks. The more unique pieces you have, the cooler the stuff you can build.” The advantage of ferromagnetism in a semiconductor is that electronic properties become spin-dependent. Electrons align their spins along internal magnetization.

Read more at Ames Laboratory

Image Credit: Ames Laboratory

-jk-