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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2020 was released on November 11th 2020. Its digital version will be available on December 2nd 2020.

Topic: Electrical switchboards and switchboard technology

Innovation, Technology, Projects
New energy law: an opportunity for energetics community
Data centres – third session
Starting October, REMA raises financial subsidy for recycling electrical devices

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Researchers help develop sustainable polymers

28. 9. 2020 | Florida State University | www.fsu.edu

Researchers at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering have made new discoveries on the effects of temperature on sustainable polymers. Their findings may help the industry to produce plastics that are better for the environment.

Plastics made from petroleum, a non-renewable resource, remain too long in our land and water when discarded,” said Rufina Alamo, a professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering. “We are researching how sustainable polymers are heated and cooled so we may produce more ‘environmentally friendly’ plastics.”

Sustainable plastis

Determining the correct temperature for processing is key to producing better materials that will help scientists replace inexpensive polymers made from petroleum with economically viable, sustainable polymers. The team is studying a type of polymer called “long-spaced polyacetals,” which are used in plastics. Synthesized in a laboratory at the University of Konstanz in Germany, the long-spaced polyacetals Alamo’s team used come from sustainable biomass. They contain a polyethylene backbone linked with acetal groups at precise equal distances. The structure combines the toughness of polyethylene with the hydrolytic degradability of the acetal group. This type of polymer is strong but breaks apart more easily with water than traditional polymers.

Read more at Florida State University

Image Credit: Mark Wallheiser

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