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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2020 was released on January 20th 2020. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring materia

Main Article
Using mHealth technolgy for automated data collection and transmission

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2019 was released on December 9th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 9th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Light technology konference of Visegrád countries LUMEN V4 2020 – 1st announcement
23rd International conference SVĚTLO – LIGHT 2019
56th Conference of Society for development public lighting in Plzeň
What is new in CIE

Interiors lighting
Halla illuminated new Booking.com offices in Prague centre

Researchers develop superconducting quantum refrigerator

05.06.2019 | University of Rochester | www.rochester.edu

Imagine a refrigerator so cold it could turn atoms into their quantum states, giving them unique properties that defy the rules of classical physics.

In a paper published in Physics Review Applied, Andrew Jordan, professor of physics at the University of Rochester, and his graduate student Sreenath Manikandan, along with their colleague Francesco Giazotto from the NEST Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore in Italy, have conceived an idea for such a refrigerator, which would cool atoms to nearly absolute zero temperatures (about minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit). Scientists could use the refrigerator, which is based on the quantum property of superconductivity, to facilitate and enhance the performance of quantum sensors or circuits for ultrafast quantum computers.

Superconducting quantum fridge

The inner workings of a superconducting quantum refrigerator

In the superconducting quantum fridge, researchers place a layered stack of metals in an already cold, cryogenic dilution refrigerator:

- The bottom layer of the stack is a sheet of the superconductor niobium, which acts as a hot reservoir, akin to the environment outside a traditional refrigerator

- The middle layer is the superconductor tantalum, which is the working substance, akin to the refrigerant in a traditional refrigerator

- The top layer is copper, which is the cold reservoir, akin to the inside of a traditional fridge

Read more at University of Rochester

Image Credit: Michael Osadciw

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