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ELEKTRO 6/2020 was released on June 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available on June 24th 2020.

Topic: Electrical machines, drives and power electronics, electromobility

Main Article
New traction power supply technology 25 kV/50 Hz (part 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Researchers develop novel wound healing technology

30. 11. 2016 | Washington State University | news.wsu.edu

A Washington State University research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections.

These bacteria are responsible for chronic and serious infections in people with lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, and in chronic wounds. They also often cause pneumonia for people who are on ventilators and infections in burn victims.

New technology for wound treatment

In the new study, the researchers used an “e-scaffold,” a sort of electronic band-aid made out of conductive carbon fabric, along with an antibiotic to specifically tackle these persister cells.

The e-scaffold creates an electrical current that produces a low and constant concentration of hydrogen peroxide, an effective disinfectant, at the e-scaffold surface. The hydrogen peroxide disrupts the biofilm matrix and damages the bacteria cell walls and DNA, which allows better antibiotic penetration and efficacy against the bacteria.

Read more at Washington State University

Image Credit: Washington State University

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