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Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2019 was released on September 3rd 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; 61th International Engineering Fair in Brno

Main Article
Residual current devices – overview and usage

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2019 was released on September 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Professional organizations activities
International conference LIGHT (SVĚTLO) 2019 – 6th announcement
We participated in International commission on illumination CIE 2019 congress in Washington
Technical colloquium SLOVALUX 2019

Fairs and exhibitions
Inspire with boho styl and design of Far East at autumn fair FOR INTERIOR

Researchers develop cheaper, faster test for E. coli in drinking water

06.09.2017 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have invented a fast, affordable way for developing communities to test their drinking water for potentially deadly E. coli.

Unlike current tests that cost about $70 and can take up to three days to get back from the lab, the Waterloo invention uses paper strips similar to those in litmus tests to produce results in less than three hours at a cost of 50 cents.

This has the potential to allow routine, affordable water testing to help billions of people in the developing world avoid getting sick,” said Sushanta Mitra, executive director of the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology. “It is a breakthrough.”

E. coli test

The bottom of the paper strip developed by Mitra and his colleagues is laced with sugar, which begins to dissolve when placed in water. E. coli bacteria are attracted by the resulting sugar trail and get trapped in the porous paper when they come in contact with it. As water enters the paper, it carries the trapped bacteria into an area of the strip containing a mixture of chemicals. The E. coli react with those chemicals and turn the strip pinkish red to signify a positive test.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH

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