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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2016 was released on December 7th 2016. Its digital version will be available on January 6th 2017.

 

Topic: Measurement, measuring devices and measurement engineering; Testing and diagnostics

 

Main Article

Lithium traction batteries for electric mobility (final part 2)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2016 was released on December 5th 2016. Its digital version will be available on January 5th 2017.

Interiors lighting
Colloquium Interiors 2016 – the fifth anniversary
Cooperation of indoor interior and lighting 

Standards, regulations and recommendations
New standards for road lighting

Renewables Grew to 15.5% of US Electricity Capacity in 2014

11.12.2015 | IEEE Spectrum | www.spectrum.ieee.org

Renewable electricity capacity reached 15.5% of the total installed electricity capacity in the US by the end of 2014, according to a report by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Installed capacity exceeded 179 gigawatts, generated 554 terawatt-hours.

The NREL team found that hydropower made up the vast majority of renewable electricity generation in 2014, followed by wind. Although solar generation still made up a small mix of the renewables, at 6%, it accounted for 22% of total electricity capacity added in 2014.

The growth of renewable energy in US

Solar was one of the fastest-growing renewables during 2014, with California setting a record for solar power generation in March 2014 and nearly doubling its solar production in less than one year. Renewables as a whole made up more than half of total electricity capacity added in 2014, with natural gas accounting for 47% of addition, and coal 1%.

Since 2004, renewable electricity capacity has grown 83%, from 98 GW to more than 179 GW in 2014. Even when hydropower is not included, renewable electricity generation has more than doubled since 2004.

With states implementing targets for renewables, such as California's goal of hitting 50% renewable electricity by 2030 and Hawaii's goal of 100%, as well global negotiations around climate change, renewables are likely to continue to grow.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum

Image Credit: NREL

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