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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2017 was released on November 6th 2017. Its digital version will be available on November 27th 2017.

Topic: Electrical distribution switchboards and switchboard technology; Rotating electrical machines

Main Article
Analysis of the CFD settings for simulating the temperature field of sinusoidal filter
On-line optimisation of current commutation angles in phases of BLDC motor

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

Probing the limits of wind power generation

04.09.2015 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Wind turbine farms now account for an estimated 3.3 percent of electricity generation in the United States, and 2.9 percent of electricity generated globally.

The wind turbine industry is growing along all vectors, with increasingly sprawling farms of ever-larger and more densely sited turbines producing growing amounts of power. But the laws of physics are stubborn - wind turbines remove kinetic energy from the atmospheric flow. So engineers and scientists have sought realistic estimates of the limits to large-scale wind generation. Such estimates could provide guidelines for the maximum size and density to which a wind turbine farm can increase before reaching a point of diminishing returns.

The limits of wind turbines

An international group of researchers recently collaborated on a comparison of two different methods of estimating the limits of power generation for wind farms, which has been reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. They approximated the dynamics by which wind turbines remove kinetic energy from the atmosphere using the vertical kinetic energy (VKE) flux method and compared the results to those from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional atmospheric model.

Their findings are complex, and while the two techniques produce results that diverge in many ways, together, they illuminate atmospheric variables that are not obviously revealed by the two methods in isolation.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Steve Wilson / Wikipedia

-jk-