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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2020 was released on February 12th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrical apparatus, Internet of Things; Medical technologies

Main Article
Monitoring vacancy of an intelligent building

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2020 was released on February 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 3th 2020.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation for Light+Building 2020 – attendant programme
Prolicht+Sound fair celebrates the 25th birthday
FOR CITY 2020 introduces oneself in parallel to FOR ARCH fair

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modern trends in automobile headlamps

Printing objects that can incorporate living organisms

24.01.2020 | MIT | www.mit.edu

A method for printing 3D objects that can control living organisms in predictable ways has been developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere. The technique may lead to 3D printing of biomedical tools, such as customized braces, that incorporate living cells to produce therapeutic compunds such as painkillers or topical treatments, the researchers say.

For their initial proof-of-concept experiments, the team precisely incorporated various chemicals into the 3D printing process. These chemicals act as signals to activate certain responses in biologically engineered microbes, which are spray-coated onto the printed object. Once added, the microbes display specific colors or fluorescence in response to the chemical signals.

3D printing with living organisms

The objective is to make a robust design tool for producing objects and devices incorporating living biological elements, made in a way that is as predictable and scalable as other industrial manufacturing processes. In their tests, the team used genetically modified E. coli bacteria, because these grow rapidly and are widely used and studied, but in principle other organisms could be used as well, the researchers say.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

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