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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2017 was released on June 26th 2017. Its digital version will be available on July 28th 2017.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable technique; Connectors; Software; Marking and labelling

Main Article
Electrical insulation and thermal conductivity

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2017 was released on August 8th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 8th 2017.

Optical radiation effects and use
Glow-worm in a light engineer eyesight

Lighting installations
OSRAM TecDay Czech Republic 2017
Workroom illumination of Dominican provincial in Prague
innogy – reconstruction of company administrative centre

Power Harvesting Sensor Patch Uses Your Body As a Battery

18.01.2016 | NC State University | licensing.research.ncsu.edu

Thermoelectric Generators (TEGs) enable energy conversion from heat to electricity and have potential applications ranging from waste heat energy harvesting to small self-powered wearable medical devices.

Unfortunately, most flexible TEGs have lower performance due to the lower heat or electrical conductivity in the flexible semiconductors used. A team of engineers at NC State University has developed a flexible TEG design that combines the significant research and development investments in rigid semiconductor materials with advancements in flexible polymer chemistry.

Wearable electronics powered by human heat

By combining these elements the inventors have been able to design a TEG prototype which is significantly more flexible than alternative chemistries; successfully combining the benefits of both flexible and traditional TEG designs.

Advantages:

  • Flexible substrate combined with rigid semiconductor core enable high performance flexibility
  • Commercial off-the-shelf parts utilize industry standard materials with NC State’s unique device designs
  • High thermal and electrical conductivity through unique device geometry

Read more at NC State University

Image Credit: NC State University

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