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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2018 was released on October 31th 2018. Its digital version will be available on November 30st 2018.

Topic: Switchboards and substations; Maintenance of electrical equipment; Rotating electrical machines and drives

Main Article
Smart Cities (part 4 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2018 was released on September 17th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Interiors lighting
Luminaire selection by the concept of interior
The unique book about interiors nowadays on market
Invitation on colloquium Interiéry 2018 – exceptional action for the seventh time

Newsreel
Profesor Jiří Habel passed away – memories remain

Perovskite solar cells hit new world efficiency record

02.12.2016 | TechXplore | techxplore.com

They're flexible, cheap to produce and simple to make - which is why perovskites are the hottest new material in solar cell design. And now, engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales in Sydney have smashed the trendy new compound's world efficiency record.

The 12.1% efficiency rating was for a 16 cm2 perovskite solar cell, the largest single perovskite photovoltaic cell certified with the highest energy conversion efficiency, and was independently confirmed by the international testing centre Newport Corp, in Bozeman, Montana. The new cell is at least 10 times bigger than the current certified high-efficiency perovskite solar cells on record.

New record for perovskite solar cell

Australian team has also achieved an 18% efficiency rating on a 1.2 cm2 single perovskite cell, and an 11.5% for a 16 cm2 four-cell perovskite mini-module, both independently certified by Newport.

Perovskite is a structured compound, where a hybrid organic-inorganic lead or tin halide-based material acts as the light-harvesting active layer. They are the fastest-advancing solar technology to date, and are attractive because the compound is cheap to produce and simple to manufacture, and can even be sprayed onto surfaces.

Read more at TechXplore

Image Credit: Rob Largent/UNSW

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