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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2019 was released on February 13th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective, signalling and special

Main Article
Advanced power converter topology
Smart Cities (part 7)

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2019 was released on February 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation at LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition
Prolight + Sound 2019: keep up with time
The light at For Arch 2018 fair

Public lighting
Lights of towns and communities 2018 – the meeting at the round table

Oxford to build spectrograph for world’s largest optical telescope

26.05.2017 | University of Oxford | www.ox.ac.uk

University of Oxford researchers will lead the design and build of the HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The HARMONI project will provide the world’s largest visible and infrared telescope with unprecedented physical insights about objects in the distant Universe.

Perched on top of Cerro Armazones in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, the E-ELT will have a giant main mirror 39 metres in diameter. The telescope will enable scientists to peer further into the history of the Universe, studying distant, young galaxies in great detail with better sensitivity than ever before — helping improve our understanding of the Universe, the effects of dark matter and energy, and planets outside of our solar system.

Largest telespoce in the world

When it is first used in 2024, the E-ELT will be equipped with three scientific instruments. One of these will be HARMONI, a spectrograph which splits the light from the object in the sky into its component wavelengths or colours. Astronomers can use these ‘spectra’ to determine far more than images alone ever can: they reveal the motion, temperature and chemical composition of structures imaged using the telescope.

Read more at University of Oxford

Image Credit: University of Oxford

-jk-