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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2017 was released on February 17th 2017. Its digital version will be available on March 10th 2017.

 

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective and signalling; Devices for smart grids

 

Main Article

Atypical concept of DC power supply source for high current consumption

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2017 was released on February 7th 2017. Its digital version will be available on March 7th 2017.

Fair and exhibitions
Invitation on LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition 

Architectural and scenic lighting
Lighting design in a nutshell
Spiegeltent illumination and its specificity

ORNL surges forward with 20-kilowatt wireless charging for vehicles

01.04.2016 | Oak Ridge National Laboratory | www.ornl.gov

A 20-kilowatt wireless charging system demonstrated at Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has achieved 90 percent efficiency and at three times the rate of the plug-in systems commonly used for electric vehicles today.

ORNL’s power electronics team achieved this world’s first 20-kilowatt wireless charging system for passenger cars by developing a unique architecture that included an ORNL-built inverter, isolation transformer, vehicle-side electronics and coupling technologies in less than three years. For the demonstration, researchers integrated the single-converter system into an electric Toyota RAV4 equipped with an additional 10-kilowatt hour battery.

Wireless car charging

The researchers are already looking ahead to their next target of 50-kilowatt wireless charging, which would match the power levels of commercially available plug-in quick chargers. Providing the same speed with the convenience of wireless charging could increase consumer acceptance of electric vehicles and is considered a key enabler for hands-free, autonomous vehicles. Higher power levels are also essential for powering larger vehicles such as trucks and buses.

Read more at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Image Credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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