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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2018 was released on May 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 6th 2018.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; EFS, EPS; ELO SYS 2018

Main Article
Energy router and its role in smart grids
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2018 was released on March 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Fairs and exhibitions
Interior elite again after year in Letňany

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
Emergency lighting
The future of industrial lighting has name INNOVA
GOLY luminaire – the practical high bay luminaire
McLED® – brand name of first rate quality LED lighting
VOLGA EU luminaire our choice for Europe

Nuclear Waste Deep Storage Plans Approved

18.11.2015 | IEEE Spectrum | www.spectrum.ieee.org

Finland’s government issued a construction license to nuclear disposal consortium Posiva. The license gives the group approval to build a storage facility on Olkiluoto Island, Finland, designed to last 100,000 years.

The facility would be the first of its kind in the world. Since the beginning of the nuclear power age, energy firms have paid to store nuclear waste in temporary holding ponds unlikely to last more than a couple of centuries. The Posiva facility, decades in the planning, may pioneer a more sustainable era of disposal.

New nuclear disposal facility in Finland

Nuclear waste consists of metal rods composed mostly of uranium with a molecular weight of 238. Over time, the depleted uranium atoms release radioactive particles - a process called decay - that converts the uranium into lighter elements. Over billions of years, those atoms decay, too. By the end, all that is left is lead.

To provide safer and more permanent storage, Posiva proposes to bury electrically-welded iron-and-copper capsules 400 meters underground. The capsules would be surrounded by clay barriers and capped with rubble and cement. The facility, which would have a 6,500 metric ton capacity, could likely hold Finland and Sweden's projected future nuclear waste. But that capacity doesn’t come close to the volume required by larger nations such as the United States, which has over 70,000 metric tons of waste piled up, and produces an additional 2,200 tons a year.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum

Image Credit: Posiva

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