We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 4-5/2020 was released on May 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electroinstallation; Lightning and overvoltage protection

Energetics
SüdOstLink
Energy law novel: An end to energy scammers

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells

18. 7. 2017 | University of Cambridge | www.cam.ac.uk

The team of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the United States, have used theoretical and experimental methods to show how bismuth – the so-called “green element” which sits next to lead on the periodic table, could be used in low-cost solar cells.

Their results, reported in the journal Advanced Materials, suggest that solar cells incorporating bismuth can replicate the properties that enable the exceptional properties of lead-based solar cells, but without the same toxicity concerns. Later calculations by another research group showed that bismuth-based cells can convert light into energy at efficiencies up to 22%, which is comparable to the most advanced solar cells currently on the market.

Non-toxic solar cells

“We wanted to find out why defects don’t appear to affect the performance of lead-halide perovskite solar cells as much as they would in other materials,” said Dr Robert Hoye of Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory and Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, and the paper’s lead author. “If we can figure out what’s special about them, then perhaps we can replicate their properties using non-toxic materials.”

Read more at University of Cambridge

Image Credit: University of Cambridge

-jk-