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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2019 was released on June 11th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 15th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Euroluce 2019 by designers eyes
Exhibition Light in architecture 2019
Amper 2019 in capture of sophisticated technologies

Refreshing our memory
Lighting glass from Kamenný pahorek

Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction

24.06.2019 | Flinders University | www.flinders.edu.au

A new nanomaterial made from phosphorus, known as phosphorene, is shaping up as a key ingredient for more sustainable and efficient next-generation perovskite solar cells (PSCs).

PSCs which are one of the fastest developing new solar technologies and can achieve efficiencies comparable to more commonly used commercially available silicon solar cells. For the first time, an international team of clean chemistry researchers led by Professor Joseph Shapter and Flinders University, has made very thin phosphorene nanosheets for low-temperature PSCs using the rapid shear stress of the University’s revolutionary vortex fluidic device (VFD).

Perovskite solar cells using phosphorene

We’ve found exciting new way to convert exfoliated black phosphorus into phosphorene which can help produce more efficient and also potentially cheaper solar cells,” says Dr Christopher Gibson, from the College of Science and Engineering at Flinders University. “Our latest experiments have improved the potential of phosphorene in solar cells, showing an extra Star efficiency of 2%-3% in electricity production.”

Read more at Flinders University

Image Credit: Joe Shapter

-jk-

Honeywell Home T9 thermostat

Published: 23.07.2019