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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2016 was released on September 27th 2016. Its digital version will be available on October 27th 2016.


Topic: 22nd International trade fair ELO SYS 2016; Electrical Power Engineering; RES; Emergency Power Units


Main Article

Power system management under utilization of Smart Grid system

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.


Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology


Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

Nexa3D needs your cash to make its 'ultrafast' 3D printer

23.11.2015 | Engadget | www.engadget.com

Company called Nexa3D has launched a product on Kickstarter, claiming that you'll be able to print objects at a speed of around 1-inch every 3 minutes. That's around 25-100 times faster than a regular 3D printer, and objects can be made to around 120 microns of detail, fairly close to the resolution of a Makerbot Replicator 2.

This new system works by using light to harden a photo-curing resin that is gradually extruded from a tank. The Nexa3D works with "self-lubricant sublayer photocuring (LSPc)" tech, that uses a layer of oil to prevent newly formed layers from sticking to the build platform. If the object size becomes large enough, then the printer switches from continuous extrusion to a sequential system that deposits the resin in layers, like a conventional 3D printer.

Ultrafast 3D printer NX1

Nexa3D says it has also greatly simplified the printing process with its resin cartridge system. Rather than needing to refill tanks or reels like a regular "PLA" printer, you just insert the cartridge and print. The system automatically fills the tank, then recaptures any unused resin for the next job. There's also a cleaning cartridge that will scrub the resin tank clean if your next job uses a new color.

Read more at Engadget

Image Credit: Nexa3D