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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2019 was released on January 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2019.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring material

Main Article
Electrically conductive adhesives for electrical engineering
Smart Cities (part 6)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2018 was released on December 3rd 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2019.

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modular floodlights Siteco
Decorative luminaire PRESBETON H-E-X from the integral series town equipment
LED luminaires ESALITE – revolution in sphere of industrial lighting

Daylight
About median illumination by daylight
Professional colloquium Daylight in practice

New technology standard could shape the future of electronics design

25.01.2018 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics.

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers show how they have pushed the memristor - a simpler and smaller alternative to the transistor, with the capability of altering its resistance and storing multiple memory states - to a new level of performance after experimenting with its component materials.

New technology standard

Memristors could hold the key to a new era in electronics, being both smaller and simpler in form than transistors, low-energy, and with the ability to retain data by 'remembering' the amount of charge that has passed through them - potentially resulting in computers that switch on and off instantly and never forget.

The University of Southampton team has demonstrated a new memristor technology that can store up to 128 discernible memory states per switch, almost four times more than previously reported.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Rob Lambert/Unsplash

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