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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2018 was released on May 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 6th 2018.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; EFS, EPS; ELO SYS 2018

Main Article
Energy router and its role in smart grids
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2018 was released on March 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Fairs and exhibitions
Interior elite again after year in Letňany

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
Emergency lighting
The future of industrial lighting has name INNOVA
GOLY luminaire – the practical high bay luminaire
McLED® – brand name of first rate quality LED lighting
VOLGA EU luminaire our choice for Europe

New stamping technique creates functional features at nanoscale dimensions

09.12.2016 | MIT | news.mit.edu

Engineers at MIT have invented a fast, precise printing process and created a stamp made from forests of carbon nanotubes that is able to print electronic inks onto rigid and flexible surfaces.

Team’s stamping process should be able to print transistors small enough to control individual pixels in high-resolution displays and touchscreens. The new printing technique may also offer a relatively cheap, fast way to manufacture electronic surfaces for as-yet-unknown applications.

New technology to print electronics

There have been other attempts in recent years to print electronic surfaces using inkjet printing and rubber stamping techniques, but with fuzzy results. Because such techniques are difficult to control at very small scales, they tend to produce “coffee ring” patterns where ink spills over the borders, or uneven prints that can lead to incomplete circuits.

To make their stamps, the researchers used the group’s previously developed techniques to grow the carbon nanotubes on a surface of silicon in various patterns, including honeycomb-like hexagons and flower-shaped designs. They coated the nanotubes with a thin polymer layer to ensure the ink would penetrate throughout the nanotube forest and the nanotubes would not shrink after the ink was stamped. Then they infused the stamp with a small volume of electronic ink containing nanoparticles such as silver, zinc oxide, or semiconductor quantum dots.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

-jk-