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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2017 was released on October 10th 2017. Its digital version will be available on October 10th 2017.

Topic: Electrical power engineering; RES; Fuel cells; Batteries and accumulators

Main Article
Electricity storage
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of batteries

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

New soft rubber for creating self-healing robots

18.08.2017 | TechXplore | www.techxplore.com

A team of researchers at Vrije Universiteit Brussel has developed a type of rubber that can be used with robots to allow them to self-heal when cut. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the team describes the rubber, how it self-heals and how it performed when tested.

One of the big goals for robot engineers has been developing a skin for robots that will heal when damaged, similar to self-healing human skin. A parallel goal is integrating soft robotic parts into applications where sensitivity is required—lifting a patient at a hospital, for example. The downside to soft materials is, of course, that they can be easily damaged, putting a robot out of commission. Ideally, robot hands and certain other parts would be both soft and self-healing, and that is what the researchers with this new effort report achieving.

Self-healing robots

The solution, the researchers believed, was a type of rubber that is soft enough to provide sensitivity, yet strong enough to maintain its shape without the need of inside support (such as bones in humans). Such a rubber would also need to be repairable without the use of glues, screws, etc., because the scar would not be as strong as the original material. The team developed just such a rubber and then used it to create the fingers for a robot.

Read more at TechXplore

Image Credit: Terryn

-jk-