We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2018 was released on February 14th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2018.

Topic: Electrical devices; Devices for smart grids; Internet of Things

Main Article
Power flow control in grid using power converters

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2018 was released on February 5th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2018.

Architectural and scenic lighting
Mexican light
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 34
Lighting technology documentation – part 2 Schemes for scenic lighting

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
NITECO LED luminaires – guarantied lifespan and warm white light not only for public lighting

New record temperature for a superconductor

21.08.2015 | Ars Technica; Johannes Gutenberg University | www.arstechnica.com

Superconductivity was first seen in metals cooled down to close to absolute zero. But after exhausting every metal on the periodic table, the critical temperature at which the metal transitions to superconductivity never budged far from those extremely low temperatures.

That changed dramatically with the development of cuprate superconductors, copper-containing ceramics that could superconduct in liquid nitrogen - still very cold (138K or - 135°C), but relatively easy to achieve. But progress has stalled, in part because we don't have a solid theory to explain superconductivity in these materials.

New temperatures in superconductor

Now, taking advantage of the fact that we do understand what's going on in superconducting metals, a German research team has reached a new record critical temperature: 203K, or -70°C, a temperature that is sometimes seen in polar regions. The material they used, however, isn't a metal that appears on the periodic table. In fact, they're not even positive they know what the material is, just that it forms from hydrogen sulfide at extreme pressures.

Read more at Ars Technica

Image Credit: Brookhaven National Lab

-jk-