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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2016 was released on November 7th 2016. Its digital version will be available on December 1st 2016.

 

Topic: Switchboards and switchboard engineering; Rotating electrical machines and power electronics; Maintenance of EE

 

Main Article

Lithium traction batteries for electric mobility (part 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2016 was released on December 5th 2016. Its digital version will be available on January 5th 2017.

Interiors lighting
Colloquium Interiors 2016 – the fifth anniversary
Cooperation of indoor interior and lighting 

Standards, regulations and recommendations
New standards for road lighting

New plastic material begins to oscillate spontaneously in sunlight

06.07.2016 | Eindhoven University of Technology | www.tue.nl

The researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and the Humboldt University in Berlin present this material ­– the first that moves spontaneously under the influence of daylight. According to the researchers, this pliable plastic is suitable as a self-cleaning surface, for example for solar cells.

Materials that move all by themselves under the influence of light – this phenomenon has been known for a number of years. However, since the source tends to be ultraviolet light, the required intensity can damage the material. The challenge was to find a material that behaves in this way in visible light, preferably unprocessed sunlight. The researchers from Eindhoven and Berlin have now succeeded in producing a thin polymer layer containing light-sensitive molecules (azo-dyes). Lying in sunlight, the thin film begins to oscillate spontaneously and irregularly.

New unique material moves in sunlight

One of the main possibilities for using the material is as a self-cleaning surface. A surface that vibrates in the sun makes it difficult for sand and dust to stick to it. Self-cleaning solar panels in the desert where there are no water supplies could be an option. But the researchers believe there is a whole range of other possible applications.

Read more at Eindhoven University of Technology

Image Credit: Eindhoven University of Technology

-jk-