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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2017 was released on October 10th 2017. Its digital version will be available on October 10th 2017.

Topic: Electrical power engineering; RES; Fuel cells; Batteries and accumulators

Main Article
Electricity storage
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of batteries

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

New nano devices could withstand extreme environments of space

29.03.2017 | TechXplore | techxplore.com

Researchers at the Stanford Extreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory, or the XLab, are developing heat-, corrosion- and radiation-resistant electronics. They hope to move research into extreme places in the universe – including here on Earth. And it all starts with tiny, nano-scale slices of material.

One hurdle to studying extreme environments is the heat. Silicon-based semiconductors, which power our smartphones and laptops, stop working at about 572 F (300 C) degrees. As they heat up, the metal parts begin to melt into neighboring semiconductor and don't move electricity as efficiently.

Meta materials for space electronics

Objects in space are pounded by a flurry of gamma and proton radiation that knock atoms around and degrade materials. Preliminary work at the XLab demonstrates that sensors they've developed could survive up to 50 years of radiation bombardment while in Earth's orbit.

Electronics designed to survive the intense conditions of space could be placed next to the engine's pistons to directly monitor performance and improve efficiency.

Read more at TechXplore

Image Credit: L.A. Cicero

-jk-