We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 3/2018 was released on March 14th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 14th 2018.

Topic: Amper 2018 – 26th International trade fair for electrical engineering

Main Article
Influence of magnetic storms on transformers of the power system

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2018 was released on March 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Fairs and exhibitions
Interior elite again after year in Letňany

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
Emergency lighting
The future of industrial lighting has name INNOVA
GOLY luminaire – the practical high bay luminaire
McLED® – brand name of first rate quality LED lighting
VOLGA EU luminaire our choice for Europe

New method for 3-D printing of living tissues

16.08.2017 | University of Oxford | www.ox.ac.uk

Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures. The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.

Printing high-resolution living tissues is hard to do, as the cells often move within printed structures and can collapse on themselves. But, led by Professor Hagan Bayley, Professor of Chemical Biology in Oxford’s Department of Chemistry, the team devised a way to produce tissues in self-contained cells that support the structures to keep their shape.

3-D printing of living tissue

The cells were contained within protective nanolitre droplets wrapped in a lipid coating that could be assembled, layer-by-layer, into living structures. Producing printed tissues in this way improves the survival rate of the individual cells, and allowed the team to improve on current techniques by building each tissue one drop at a time to a more favourable resolution.

Read more at University of Oxford

Image Credit: University of Oxford