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Current issue

ELEKTRO 3/2021 was released on March 10th 2021. Its digital version will be available on March 26th 2021.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; Surge protection

Innovation, Technology, Projects
History of STEGO products
Industry 4.0 – past and present
Panasonic: Industrial automation products for your testing
ABB announced a significant increase in the number of charging stations in the Czech Republic

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2021 was released 2.12.2021. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Interiors lighting
Interior of the year 2020 – offices in time of home office
PROLICHT CZECH fulfils images of architect about illumination of Obecní dvůr residence at Prague Old Town

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Covid 19 – are there actually any news at lighting producer?
Lighting systems of STEINEL company

New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft

25. 1. 2017 | University of Michigan | ns.umich.edu

When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of University of Michigan researchers have developed a new way to design a “metamaterial” that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.

Metamaterials are man-made materials that get their properties—in this case, whether a material is hard or soft—from the way the material is constructed rather than the material that constructs it. This allows researchers to manipulate a metamaterial's structure in order to make the material exhibit a certain property.

New metamaterial

In the group's study the U-M researchers discovered a way to compose a metamaterial that can be easily manipulated to increase the stiffness of its surface by orders of magnitude—the difference between rubber and steel. The material could one day be used to build cars or rocket launch systems. In cars, the material could help absorb impacts from a crash. The researchers also suggest the material could be used to make bicycle tires that could self-adjust to ride more easily on soft surfaces such as sand, or to make damage-resistant, reusable rockets.

Read more at University of Michigan

Image Credit: Adobe Stock

-jk-