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Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2018 was released on June 6th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 26th 2018.

Topic: Rotating electrical machines, drives and power electronics; Electromobility

Main Article
Energy platform for vehicle-to-grid/home system
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 2)

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2018 was released on June 15th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 17th 2018.

Accessories of lighting installations
Evening with Foxtrot on the Czech heaven

Public lighting
Timeless luminaire for public lighting – Streetlight 11
Control of public lighting

New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft

25.01.2017 | University of Michigan | ns.umich.edu

When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of University of Michigan researchers have developed a new way to design a “metamaterial” that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself.

Metamaterials are man-made materials that get their properties—in this case, whether a material is hard or soft—from the way the material is constructed rather than the material that constructs it. This allows researchers to manipulate a metamaterial's structure in order to make the material exhibit a certain property.

New metamaterial

In the group's study the U-M researchers discovered a way to compose a metamaterial that can be easily manipulated to increase the stiffness of its surface by orders of magnitude—the difference between rubber and steel. The material could one day be used to build cars or rocket launch systems. In cars, the material could help absorb impacts from a crash. The researchers also suggest the material could be used to make bicycle tires that could self-adjust to ride more easily on soft surfaces such as sand, or to make damage-resistant, reusable rockets.

Read more at University of Michigan

Image Credit: Adobe Stock

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